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  • 16 x 24 cabin

    My house is a 16x24 cabin that was build as a storage shed for the 4000 square foot monstrosity my ex wanted to build. I've been living in it since it was dried in and that has proved interesting, but it has allowed me to really look and think about what I needed and how different areas needed to evolve to make it into a comfortable living space. To start with it had 2 rooms and a bath. The smaller room is 9 feet by 16 feet, actually it is just shy of being the full 9 feet. That has been turned into my sleeping and studying area. The larger room I kept open until earlier this year when I finally lucked up and found propane appliances for a song. I didn't want to make that 12x15 foot space feel any smaller, but discovered that by using my old wooden pantry shelves as the center element and adding an old time secretary between it and the wall I had a very nice open feel and still have 4 foot of walk space in my kitchen. Oh and I do have a small cabinet unit on the opposite side of my cabinet. Currently I am trying to puzzle out how to put in the copper pipe and hook it to the stove and refrigerator. I want to add propane lights at a later date as well, so this is a learning experience for me Anyone that has already gone through this process want to pipe up and tell me what to look out for? I know how to do it, my brother installed his propane heater, but I am wondering if there are some things other then the obvious cautions? (leaks and pipe kinks ) The first photo is a collage of the dry layup of the divider wall. That one small cabinet gives me nearly as much kitchen storage as the full pantry does. The second photo shows a little of the living-room side. The chair is another project that needs recovering and the feed sack contains a wool fleece I'm a farmer and that is wool I need to process to be spun.
    Click image for larger version

Name:	51890296_10216202845236816_2029152097789804544_n.jpg?_nc_cat=110&_nc_eui2=AeFHhH9fror0SIOiua2dvi-CPoTC8a6hQnIbLe25ngx8YdWKq03O5VHUvoFp2VXlfodZVM2tPEBYUgefAeriB5dEpoupU_yAT3kyMXigXZbRyw&_nc_ht=scontent-atl3-1.xx&oh=df4d70255c0766f9a327b8eba9a78
Views:	238
Size:	15.8 KB
ID:	142
    Thanks
    Norma
    Attached Files

  • #2
    Hi Norma
    I liked reading your post, always curious and envious of tiny dwellers. Thank you for letting me into your world! I’m taking care of mom for many years. Moms a collector of things. I’m a minimalist.
    Wanderlust wannabe that’s me

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by Norma View Post
      My house is a 16x24 cabin that was build as a storage shed for the 4000 square foot monstrosity my ex wanted to build. I've been living in it since it was dried in and that has proved interesting, but it has allowed me to really look and think about what I needed and how different areas needed to evolve to make it into a comfortable living space. To start with it had 2 rooms and a bath. The smaller room is 9 feet by 16 feet, actually it is just shy of being the full 9 feet. That has been turned into my sleeping and studying area. The larger room I kept open until earlier this year when I finally lucked up and found propane appliances for a song. I didn't want to make that 12x15 foot space feel any smaller, but discovered that by using my old wooden pantry shelves as the center element and adding an old time secretary between it and the wall I had a very nice open feel and still have 4 foot of walk space in my kitchen. Oh and I do have a small cabinet unit on the opposite side of my cabinet. Currently I am trying to puzzle out how to put in the copper pipe and hook it to the stove and refrigerator. I want to add propane lights at a later date as well, so this is a learning experience for me Anyone that has already gone through this process want to pipe up and tell me what to look out for? I know how to do it, my brother installed his propane heater, but I am wondering if there are some things other then the obvious cautions? (leaks and pipe kinks ) The first photo is a collage of the dry layup of the divider wall. That one small cabinet gives me nearly as much kitchen storage as the full pantry does. The second photo shows a little of the living-room side. The chair is another project that needs recovering and the feed sack contains a wool fleece I'm a farmer and that is wool I need to process to be spun.
      Click image for larger version

Name:	51890296_10216202845236816_2029152097789804544_n.jpg?_nc_cat=110&_nc_eui2=AeFHhH9fror0SIOiua2dvi-CPoTC8a6hQnIbLe25ngx8YdWKq03O5VHUvoFp2VXlfodZVM2tPEBYUgefAeriB5dEpoupU_yAT3kyMXigXZbRyw&_nc_ht=scontent-atl3-1.xx&oh=df4d70255c0766f9a327b8eba9a78
Views:	238
Size:	15.8 KB
ID:	142
      Thanks
      Norma
      Definitely be careful with the propane pipes and leaks! A tiny house can still give off a big explosion Thanks for sharing your tiny home with us. Definitely keep us updated on what modifications and changes you make during your tiny house journey.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by Norma View Post
        My house is a 16x24 cabin that was build as a storage shed for the 4000 square foot monstrosity my ex wanted to build. I've been living in it since it was dried in and that has proved interesting, but it has allowed me to really look and think about what I needed and how different areas needed to evolve to make it into a comfortable living space. To start with it had 2 rooms and a bath. The smaller room is 9 feet by 16 feet, actually it is just shy of being the full 9 feet. That has been turned into my sleeping and studying area. The larger room I kept open until earlier this year when I finally lucked up and found propane appliances for a song. I didn't want to make that 12x15 foot space feel any smaller, but discovered that by using my old wooden pantry shelves as the center element and adding an old time secretary between it and the wall I had a very nice open feel and still have 4 foot of walk space in my kitchen. Oh and I do have a small cabinet unit on the opposite side of my cabinet. Currently I am trying to puzzle out how to put in the copper pipe and hook it to the stove and refrigerator. I want to add propane lights at a later date as well, so this is a learning experience for me Anyone that has already gone through this process want to pipe up and tell me what to look out for? I know how to do it, my brother installed his propane heater, but I am wondering if there are some things other then the obvious cautions? (leaks and pipe kinks ) The first photo is a collage of the dry layup of the divider wall. That one small cabinet gives me nearly as much kitchen storage as the full pantry does. The second photo shows a little of the living-room side. The chair is another project that needs recovering and the feed sack contains a wool fleece I'm a farmer and that is wool I need to process to be spun.
        Hello Norma, I don't mean to sound "preachy" in any way but I concur with Gene. Propane is no joke, even a small pinhole leak or a bad solder joint could easily send your entire cabin up in a huge explosion. I hope you're using a professional when it comes to setting up your propane system. Just a friendly suggestion and thanks for sharing your story and photos!

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Norma View Post
          My house is a 16x24 cabin that was build as a storage shed for the 4000 square foot monstrosity my ex wanted to build. I've been living in it since it was dried in and that has proved interesting, but it has allowed me to really look and think about what I needed and how different areas needed to evolve to make it into a comfortable living space. To start with it had 2 rooms and a bath. The smaller room is 9 feet by 16 feet, actually it is just shy of being the full 9 feet. That has been turned into my sleeping and studying area. The larger room I kept open until earlier this year when I finally lucked up and found propane appliances for a song. I didn't want to make that 12x15 foot space feel any smaller, but discovered that by using my old wooden pantry shelves as the center element and adding an old time secretary between it and the wall I had a very nice open feel and still have 4 foot of walk space in my kitchen. Oh and I do have a small cabinet unit on the opposite side of my cabinet. Currently I am trying to puzzle out how to put in the copper pipe and hook it to the stove and refrigerator. I want to add propane lights at a later date as well, so this is a learning experience for me Anyone that has already gone through this process want to pipe up and tell me what to look out for? I know how to do it, my brother installed his propane heater, but I am wondering if there are some things other then the obvious cautions? (leaks and pipe kinks ) The first photo is a collage of the dry layup of the divider wall. That one small cabinet gives me nearly as much kitchen storage as the full pantry does. The second photo shows a little of the living-room side. The chair is another project that needs recovering and the feed sack contains a wool fleece I'm a farmer and that is wool I need to process to be spun.
          Click image for larger version

Name:	51890296_10216202845236816_2029152097789804544_n.jpg?_nc_cat=110&_nc_eui2=AeFHhH9fror0SIOiua2dvi-CPoTC8a6hQnIbLe25ngx8YdWKq03O5VHUvoFp2VXlfodZVM2tPEBYUgefAeriB5dEpoupU_yAT3kyMXigXZbRyw&_nc_ht=scontent-atl3-1.xx&oh=df4d70255c0766f9a327b8eba9a78
Views:	238
Size:	15.8 KB
ID:	142
          Thanks
          Norma
          Hi Norma, That’s a really cool set up you got there. I’m the wrong person to give any advice on propane, plumbing, or anything like that. I wish I knew more to help ya out.
          This it totally off topic but I’m a huge knitter and have slowly gotten into macrame and other fiber arts. I see you spin wool which I think is super cool. Do you sell yarn? I’m still new to the terminology of the wool world or anything about the process of harvesting it and processing it but I do love the super bulky yarn (which I believe is called Roving yarn??). Anyway, I don’t want to take away from your initial question so if you want to talk wool I think you can private message me on here. If not I totally understand. I won’t take it personal.
          Good luck with your project! ❤️🤗

          Comment


          • #6
            Hey Steph,
            I've not sold a lot of wool, but have thought about it. The roving yarn is pretty, but in the long run, it doesn't hold up well. It is roving, roving is what we draft and spin to make a smaller yarn, but there are ways to get a large yarn with some twist that will hold together a lot better
            Norma

            Comment


            • #7
              Grant, my brother IS a professional. I will do it, but he will double check behind me. I need to be able to fix anything that needs fixing. I can't rely on being able to find someone to fix what I need where I am, and the only way I can learn how to do that is to put it in at the start. Thanks for your concern though.
              Norma

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Norma View Post
                Hey Steph,
                I've not sold a lot of wool, but have thought about it. The roving yarn is pretty, but in the long run, it doesn't hold up well. It is roving, roving is what we draft and spin to make a smaller yarn, but there are ways to get a large yarn with some twist that will hold together a lot better
                Norma
                Thanks for the info Norma! If I were using roving yarn it would be more for "art" like wall hangings so it wouldn't need to be too durable. Good luck with everything. If I ever need a yarn experts advice I'll be in touch! 😉❤️

                Comment


                • #9
                  Hi Steph,
                  It probably does well for that. I know a couple of gals that got caught up in the hype and made blankets and rugs from it. They were really disappointed when they started to come apart in such a short time. My great aunt did the hooked rugs from wool strips. My goal is to learn to do it her way at some point. She made room sized rugs that way

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Norma View Post
                    Hi Steph,
                    It probably does well for that. I know a couple of gals that got caught up in the hype and made blankets and rugs from it. They were really disappointed when they started to come apart in such a short time. My great aunt did the hooked rugs from wool strips. My goal is to learn to do it her way at some point. She made room sized rugs that way
                    I want to try the hooked method too. haha. I'm a sucker for anything crafty. There's not enough time in the day for me to try out all the things I find on Pinterest. lol. Another reason for me to downsize into a Tiny House so I can enjoy life more and craft my heart out!

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Hippie Steph View Post

                      I want to try the hooked method too. haha. I'm a sucker for anything crafty. There's not enough time in the day for me to try out all the things I find on Pinterest. lol. Another reason for me to downsize into a Tiny House so I can enjoy life more and craft my heart out!
                      lol I I agree, between farming, crafting and the part time job at the local convenience store (been in the community for around 75 years). A small house is a must. I don't have time to maintain a larger one lol, heck there are days when I don't have time to maintain the one I have

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Norma View Post

                        lol I I agree, between farming, crafting and the part time job at the local convenience store (been in the community for around 75 years). A small house is a must. I don't have time to maintain a larger one lol, heck there are days when I don't have time to maintain the one I have
                        Hi Norma, It's been a while since I've been able to hang out here and catch up.
                        Wow, 75 years! There are definitely positives to calling the entire community family. You always have a support system. As I get older I couldn't agree with you more about maintaining a larger home. I hate it! I always dreamed of living in a multi level home (I thought that meant I had made it - lol) but I hate it with every ounce of my body. Especially when there is only my husband, dog and me. So my goal is to be in a tiny house soon. What a dream it would be to enjoy life and craft my little heart out. haha.

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