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Doug's DIY - Interior

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    Doug's DIY - Interior

    I intend to update this weekly, or so. If you have already built, or are building a tiny solo with only occasional help, you know it won't change too much week to week. If you are contemplating a DIY build, let this be a lesson. It will go slow!! First image is looking aft, second is looking towards the front of the house. Plans for the next week are to continue putting up paneling and trimming out openings as I go. Ceiling "trim", which holds the flimsy revply paneling in place, will also be secured. I hope.

    BTW, the lunge whip leaning up against the right front corner of the house is vital. If I hold it as high as I can reach, the tip is at 13'8". I used it to assess clearances on the drive to the current build site. Had to lift wires (cable TV) in two places to avoid hitting them.


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    Last edited by Doug; 08-06-2019, 08:12 PM.
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    #2
    Looking good Doug. I'm sure it seems like slow going during the building process but you'll be living comfortably in your custom built tiny house before you know it.

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      #3
      Did you use SIPs?

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        #4
        Originally posted by CasitaiiTiny View Post
        Did you use SIPs?
        Nope. Everything might have been easier if I had, but nope. To make sense of the "studless" walls, and how I provided shear strength, etc., I'll post a photo of the "bones" of my tiny house. As you can almost see, I have essentially no thermal breaks. The horizontal 2x4 on the front wall is actually a 1x3 (ripped 1/2" from both sides) and the vertical 2x4s are actually 2x3s (ripped 1/2" from the nominal 4"). The 2x4s on the side walls are what they appear, and they protrude 1/2" beyond the blue insulation and provide structure to attach the wall paneling. The walls themselves are 4" of rigid foam insulation. I also have no utilities buried in the walls, but more on that later.

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          #5
          I've built what is essentially a cross braced post and beam house. The structure is the ten 4x4 posts (1 at each corner and 3 along each side) and the red painted 1/8" by 2" steel cross bracing. All of the 2x4s are temporary bracing, as is the gray steel angle supporting the red steel. Sheathing is 5/8 at the ends of the house and 1/2" on the sides. Structural analysis shows that this is at least as strong as a more conventional framed house, and it weighs a lot less. It also supports a high R-value insulation system.

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            #6
            Wow Doug Very well done! I've not seen any such framing before, but I agree that this should be just as strong (if not stronger) and much lighter. I've seen some people build 24" OC walls, but that made me nervous. I bet you had a time drilling through the steel for those bolts where the cross-members meet the bottom plate! I ran 5/8" threaded rods from top plate down through the trailer flange for a continuous connection, but my build is pretty heavy and won't be towed very often.

            Again, I admire the fine craftsmanship!

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              #7
              CasitaiiTiny Thanks. I should mention two more things. First, once everything was in place and stable, I bolted the steel to the sheathing, 5 or 6 bolts per cross brace (machine screws countersunk into the sheathing with stop nuts on the inside.) Second, in order to avoid bulges in the insulation and in the interior in general, I had to router out for the thickness of the bracing in the top beams and then to get a tight fit of the insulation against the sheathing, I had to router out 2.25" wide paths in the first layer of rigid insulation to accommodate the steel.

              Bottom line is that what was supposed to be straightforward turned into a hyper-fiddly, overly complicated project. I would not advise this approach to anyone with a modicum of good sense. :-)

              Indeed, drilling through the flange on the trailer to hold the cross bracing was a PITA. And 5/8" all thread might have been simpler and less expensive than the zillion Simpson hold-downs on the 4x4s, if only I'd thought of it.

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                #8
                Week 2. Interior panel install is largely done. Ceiling cross bracing needs tightening, windows need trim (Al angle), and the last sheet over the kitchen, which awaits the completion of the egress opening, remain to be done, but I'm moving on to PAINT!. I think it will be easier to install the Al trim after the paint. The Al you see in the pictures is all part of holding the crappy RevPly (think construction paper) in place, and I will need to cut in or mask, as appropriate. Oh well.

                The Baltic Birch will be simply varnished, but all other wood will be painted. Color scheme TBD.


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                  #9
                  Looks like you've made quite a bit of progress since your last update. It's really cool to see your project as it progresses and gets closer and closer to reality. Please continue to keep us updated as your build moves forward. I can't wait to see the final product. Do you have an estimated completion date and how long ago did you start the build? Nice work Doug!

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                    #10
                    It is slow going. I started in April 2018, took the cold and snowy winter off, and resumed this April. I hope to have it livable before winter sets in this year, and in any event, I think I loose my "free" park and build site on New Years, so I WILL be done by then.

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