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    #16
    By applying for a Permit, you will have a safe route approved to travel without taking the top of your Tiny off. It will most definitely be a longer route than you would have to otherwise take, but if you don't plan on moving it often that may work best for you.

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      #17
      Originally posted by Nanci View Post
      By applying for a Permit, you will have a safe route approved to travel without taking the top of your Tiny off. It will most definitely be a longer route than you would have to otherwise take, but if you don't plan on moving it often that may work best for you.
      Agreed ... but don't let your guard down just because you have an "approved" route. Their data could be old or just plain wrong and the consequences are catastrophic. Someone said something about having a helper travel on top of the house to move wires ... that's a terrible (and dangerous) idea. If you are not sure about this, there are pros who can get it done. As you said, it's not going to occur very often, maybe hiring pros is the best solution.

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        #18
        I'm currently building a THOW and the trailer is an old RV trailer so high off the ground. To overcome the height issue and keep it under 13'6" I did not build a loft to sleep in. I decided to install a bed on a lift that will come down and sit on top of the built in seating in the living room to ensure it's steady and solid when used as a bed. I have high ceilings and upper cabinets that can be used for storage now because of this design. Will start installing the bed and lift in the next couple of weekends.

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          #19
          There are so many great ideas that you can explore. That's a big part of the tiny house experience. Enjoy! Two other ideas that can work ... sliding bed under the main seating area and pull down bed (on a hinge) that is up against a wall. The basic "sleeper couch" is always workable and a much easier installation. Before you start, do your weight and towing calculations. Make sure you know what your trailer can hold and be sure your tires are up to the challenge. Lastly, you may not actually be saving anything by building on a used trailer. There are a zillion articles about this, so check them out. Knock it out of the park and keep posting along the way. There's a lot of help here if you want it.
          Last edited by ThinHaus; 09-17-2019, 07:14 AM.

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            #20
            Originally posted by BlueRidgeTHOW View Post
            Have you considered building it with an expandable/raisable hydraulic roof!?
            I'm curious, has anyone information on systems that can modify roof heights using hydraulics?

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              #21
              I am 6'1" tall and have been involved in the design of several tiny houses. I would suggest that you stick with the 13'6" maximum height and rather try to keep the thickness of the loft floor and roof as thin as possible. Also make sure that you keep the nature of your floor framing as low profile as possible. A few inches here and there can make a lot of difference. Consider making the height of the bottom of the loft only 2" taller than you are. Do the floor framing for the loft with nothing thicker than 2x4's with 1/2" plywood or OSB on top. It can help too if you leave the framing open on the bottom (without ceiling). This gives you an extra feeling of height that is almost free. Do your roof framing with nothing bigger than 2x6 rafters. If you will be living in a really cold climate you might want to consider foam insulation for a higher R value in the roof. Otherwise that is a thick enough roof to get enough insulation in.

              One other approach that I have run across that I think is a good one is to put the bed in a pull out under the floor of an elevated area - such as kitchen and or bathroom. Part of the end of the mattress can function as a couch during the day if you want. You do need to have enough clear floor space to pull the mattress out the rest of the way at night but your bedroom space ends up sharing the room height with the rest of the space. See the sketch below.


              Click image for larger version

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                #22
                I don't have any specific information about raising the roof but I do think that it would probably be easier to use RV electric leveling jacks rather than hydraulics. The jacks would be totally self-contained and would not require any additional equipment to generate hydraulic pressure. Also I rather suspect that leveling jacks could be set up to use the same kind of control switch that would be used with that type of jacks to actually level a travel trailer or RV. I suppose it would be possible to create a two story tiny house that could collapse down to the 13'6" height for travel. Of course one would have to be careful about overall weight issues when doing up such a design.

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                  #23
                  Thanks for the response, Malconium, I've also thought that if it were important, a gooseneck trailer might also be the answer for a more reasonable headroom in a sleeping quarters. By putting the bedroom over the gooseneck, I would think there would be more possibilities.

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                    #24
                    Well it is also possible to forgo having a sleeping loft altogether and have a bedroom on the main level. That mostly means that the tiny house might need to be longer than otherwise. I suspect too that it is just of matter of time before we see more things done with pop outs on tiny houses.

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                      #25
                      My thought is that if you have to forgo the loft (which I plan to), you can invest in a murphy bed, an elevator bed (that lowers from the ceiling), a bed that rises from the floor, or one that pulls out from under the kitchen. In that respect--or any of them, you won't necessarily add too much more length to your home, but rather plan to drop the bedroom down into the living room space. It requires a bit more planning, but it's doable and doesn't add length or too much weight to your home.

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                        #26
                        I agree that these are all good options depending on overall needs. I think the main reason that having a main level dedicated bedroom is so that it is in fact a dedicated sleeping space that if needed can be separate from the rest of the tiny house. That could be more important if more than one person lives in the tiny house. My wife and I are currently living in our remodeled 1973 Airstream trailer while I build our house. It has about 200 square feet of floor space including a separate dedicated bedroom. That works well for us largely because my wife and I get up and go to bed at different times. We can do that without bothering each other too much. That would not work well without the dedicated bedroom.

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                          #27
                          That definitely changes what I would suggest.

                          My first question is why you're moving out of the Airstream.

                          My second thought revolves around my own plans for my tiny house. I do a lot of cooking, so I need plenty of kitchen space, but I also don't want my kitchen to be open to my bed (no loft). My plan is to have an area separated off the kitchen that has pocket doors which can be shut during cooking which will include a murphy bed/living room mix. And while that seems to go against your idea of separating things--because of your diverse sleep schedules. In my home, there will be a comfy corner to both pop open a table, curl up for a nap, or use my computer (laptop). It will also contain my dog beds and a little bit of storage. Yes, that sounds like a lot of things for a space to do--but when we get into tiny living, that's what we need. And that would be a separate space for you to hang out when you're not on the same schedule.

                          Both Pinterest and the other tiny house websites have a lot of great ideas for dealing with things. Also, there's a very specific Tiny House Nation episode (https://tinyhousetalk.com/tiny-house...or-nba-player/) that revolves around making a house work for a very tall guy. Note, I am not affiliated with that link or trying to get you to buy anything.

                          I hope that helps!

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