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A simple Ten sided yurt like structure...

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    A simple Ten sided yurt like structure...

    I have been interested in yurts for some time now. As part of my interest in them I came up with a design for a ten-sided rigid yurt like structure that I call a TenYurt. You can read about the design and even purchase a copy of my plans if you are interested by referring to my blog about DIY prefabrication techniques.

    http://www.diy-prefab.com/

    Click on the picture of the TenYurt on the right side of the above web page.
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    #2
    im a big fan of yurts! there is a campground we love in Napa California that rents them on a nightly basis at the local state park, we usually camp but one day i would love to stay in one!

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      #3
      Originally posted by malconium View Post
      I have been interested in yurts for some time now. As part of my interest in them I came up with a design for a ten-sided rigid yurt like structure that I call a TenYurt. You can read about the design and even purchase a copy of my plans if you are interested by referring to my blog about DIY prefabrication techniques.

      http://www.diy-prefab.com/

      Click on the picture of the TenYurt on the right side of the above web page.
      I adore Yurts.... However I'm a widow in my sixties and just not up to the challenge a building one! LOL

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        #4
        Yurts are pretty interesting structures. They have a long history in their various forms. Its my understanding that authentic Mongolian style yurts are made of thick felt made from wool fibers. It seems like that would be a pretty rugged material to use for that purpose. Modern day yurts are available from a number of manufacturers here in the US and they typically use modern fabrics of various types that are pretty durable but certainly not as thick. They are somewhat more time consuming to set up than a simple camping tent but not really all that hard. I think the hardest part of dealing with a modern yurt kit is that you need to have some sort of base or floor to set them up on. Most of the yurt kits that I am aware of do not provide the materials for building a floor but some provide plans. Building a suitable floor does not have to be much more complicated than building a deck. How exactly you would want to build one does depend on how large of a yurt you buy and what your use is going to be. Yurts can be set up to be a year round residence in a lot of different climate zones and some come with extra insulation options to make them better suited to extremes of climate. A small size yurt could make a nice backyard building that could be used as a craft room or other occasional use space. I bet there are even some used ones for sale out there from time to time. So I guess my bottom line is that there are a lot of different ways to go after having a yurt and the amount of work need not be huge if you can afford to buy a commercially manufactured model.

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          #5
          Hi Malconium

          My husband and I have pretty much decided on a yurt for our tiny/small home and thanks to you and talking about wooden yurts, we have found a company, Smiling Wooden Yurts, that we are going to be contacting to buy a wooden yurt. What an incredible site they have and we have since found info via YouTube of people building yurts from Smiling Wooden Yurts. I think we will get a contractor to do the actual foundation, setup and finishing of the yurt. My husband and I are both in our 60s, he is still working, and I'm disabled, so we think this will work a little better for us. However, if I'm not in school when we start, I'll act as site supervisor cuz I WANT IT DONE RIGHT, dagnabit. Friends of ours bought a Deltec Round House from Deltec, located in North Carolina and they shipped it to California and it is beautiful - just a little out of our price range. I love the concept of a round house design and the wooden yurt is a perfect solution. We may use their contractor since he now has some experience dealing with Los Angeles County Building and Safety and Zoning, permits, etc.

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            #6
            Hi TinyHouseGirl

            I remember looking at the Smiling Wooden Yurts website some time ago now. I was impressed at that time with their product offerings. I was interested to discover that their metal roof panels are made by a company that makes agricultural silos which are, of course, round structures. I think that it is a clever way to provide a round metal roof system. Rigid round structures can be somewhat difficult to do the roofing for since most standard roofing materials are for rectangular shapes. Even putting plywood on the roof is a bit of a trick since everything is curved or triangular. If I am not mistaken I think that the metal roof that Smiling Wooden Yurts supplies does not require any plywood or OSB sub sheathing. I would be interested to see what kind of equipment is used to make the triangular shaped roof panels. Since the silo company makes a lot of different size silos they would have to have ways to make different size panels and perhaps with different angles for each. How large of a yurt do you hope to end up with?

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              #7
              Hi Malconium

              We are thinking of the 25 ft diameter wooden yurt which would give us between 500 and 600 square feet. We like the overall footprint that we think will work for us though we might put a loft in for the bed room. I'm not entirely sure I want living-dining-kitchen and bedroom all in the same space, I would prefer not to have walls breaking up all that wonderful open space.

              I think maybe have the bedroom upstairs in a loft space would maintain the openness of living in the yurt.

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                #8
                Hi TinyHouseGirl,

                Having a sleeping loft would indeed free up floor space on the main level. Depending on where it is relative to other things below a loft can impact the open feeling simply because the ceiling is lower in that location. The thing to do is to put the loft over the bathroom and maybe part of the kitchen in places where having a lower ceiling works well. That way the main part of the living/dining area can still have an open vaulted ceiling.

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                  #9
                  Thanks. Those are great suggestions, and I'll definitely include them when we start the planning.

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                    #10
                    Can yurts be permanent or are they typically set up to be 'tent-like?' It doesn't seem like a fabric house would have much durability.

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                      #11
                      Fabric covered yurts come in different levels of durability but many of them are designed to last a long time. Modern day fabrics are quite durable and I think many of the yurt manufacturers offer different levels of material depending on your objectives and budget. Also most manufacturers offer replacement covers so if and when the original one gets too warn out you can buy a replacement skin. The level of permanence also depends to some degree on what kind of base the yurt is installed on. It seems like they are often installed on a base that is constructed much like a deck would be. Namely using concrete pier pads and wood or composite deck boards. The more permanent the foundation the longer the overall life of the yurt. I guess the short answer is that they can last a long time if they are installed with that in mind and sufficient attention is given to maintenance when needed.

                      Rigid yurts are in another category than fabric covered ones. They can be built with virtually the same level of strength and durability as a regular house would be. They can be built on a permanent foundation and should last as long as a comparably constructed conventionally shaped building.

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                        #12
                        Hi Valerie, as Malconium mentioned, durability has become fairly consistent based on foundation/platform/base and tent materials often come with a 10-15-20 year warranty. Traditional yurts can be permanently attached to f foundation. There are several yurt companies in California, Oregon and Washington that have been building yurts for permanent residence for lots of years now. It's also become a popular style of home in Hawaii.

                        Additionally, Smiling Wooden Yurts, a company we are considering for our yurt build, constructs theirs out of wood with a metal roof which has the longevity and durability as more traditional wood built permanent foundation home.

                        Hope that provides some inspiration for you in your search.

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                          #13
                          Hi All,
                          I'm very interested in Yurts.
                          When we bicycled from Washington, D.C. to Pittsburg along the C&O and GAP Bikepaths we camped using hammocks.
                          So, the one night we stayed in a Yurt at a campground seemed luxurious.
                          It had a permanent floor, heat, kitchen, electricity, fridge, beds, even an attached outdoor deck.
                          Luxury!

                          Q: Does anyone have information on US East Coast companies specializing in Yurts?

                          Thank you for all the great info above.
                          Take care,
                          Eric

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