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  • Hello, Tiny House Forum

    My interests are in the politics, law, design and experiences of small living spaces and their evolution.

  • #2
    Originally posted by MikeL View Post
    My interests are in the politics, law, design and experiences of small living spaces and their evolution.
    Welcome to the forum Mike. Hope to see you active here, don’t be shy.

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    • #3
      One of the major complications for THOWs is that every state, city, and county has different laws. Some people place a lot of energy on the build of their tiny home to only find out after it's built that they aren't sure where to park it. I feel very lucky that I found something quite easily. I know others who look for months since many have to go "under the radar" depending on zoning laws. There's a huge movement to change all this due to many things, but primarily for affordable housing.

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      • #4
        Thanks for the replies, Chuck, SH121 and crystalvernon. Affordable housing is the rampant pathology and according to Desmond,and why should there not also be voucher assistance for THOWs?. The global affordable housing gap now stands at $740 billion.

        'We have the money. We've just made choices about how to spend it. Over the years, lawmakers on both sides of the aisle have restricted housing aid to the poor but expanded it to the affluent in the form of tax benefits for homeowners. In 2008....federal expenditures for direct housing assistance totaled less than $40.2 billion, but homeowner tax benefits exceeded $171 billion. That number, $171 billion, was equivalent to the 2008 budgets for the Department of Education, the Department of Veterans Affairs, the Department of Homeland Security, the Department of Justice, and the Department of Agriculture combined. Each year we spend three times what a universal housing voucher program is estimated to cost (in total) on homeowner benefits, like the mortgage-interest deduction and the capital-gains exclusion.

        Most federal housing subsidies benefit families with six-figure incomes. If we are going to spend the bulk of our public dollars on the affluent -- at least when it comes to housing -- we should own up to that decision and stop repeating the politicians' canard about one of the richest countries on the planet being unable to afford doing more. If poverty persists in America, it is not for lack of resources.'
        (Desmond, Evicted: Poverty and Profit in the American City, p. 312)

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